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  • Shooting the Achilles heel of nervous system cancers
    Scientists have devised a strategy to target cancer cells while sparing normal cells by capitalizing on vulnerabilities that are exposed only in tumor cells. These vulnerabilities are known as the 'Achilles heel' of cancer cells. Although much is known about the mutations that cause a cell to become malignant, little ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Sunny, rainy, or cloudy: New study shows how weather impacts response to mobile ads
    Among the many factors that impact digital marketing and online advertising strategy, a new study provides insight to a growing trend among firms and big brands: weather-based advertising. According to the study, certain weather conditions are more amenable for consumer responses to mobile marketing efforts, while the tone of your ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Ancient Italian fossils reveal risk of parasitic infections due to climate change
    In 2014, a team of researchers found that clams from the Holocene Epoch (that began 11,700 years ago) contained clues about how sea level rise due to climate change could foreshadow a rise in parasitic trematodes. Now, an international team has found that rising seas could be detrimental to human ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Gene variant increases risk for depression, study finds
    A gene variant, thought to be carried by nearly 25 percent of the population, increases the odds of developing depression, finds a new study. People with apolipoprotein-E4, called ApoE4 for short, have a 20 percent greater chance of developing clinically significant depressive symptoms later in life compared to those who ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Opioids and obesity, not ‚despair deaths,‘ raising mortality rates for white Americans
    Drug-related deaths among middle-aged white men increased more than 25-fold between 1980 and 2014, with the bulk of that spike occurring since the mid-1990s when addictive prescription opioids became broadly available, according to new research. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • How CRISPR proteins find their target
    In addition to the Cas9 protein that bacteria use to bind and snip DNA, bacteria have other Cas proteins that know where to insert that viral DNA into the CRISPR region to remember which viruses have attacked and mount a defense. A research team has discovered how these proteins -- ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Biological hydraulic system discovered in tuna fins
    The unique system of hydraulic control of fins discovered in tuna indicates a new role for the lymphatic system in vertebrates. This natural mechanism may inspire designs for new 'smart' control surfaces with changeable shape and stiffness for both air and underwater unmanned vehicles. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Evidence for the Majorana fermion, a particle that’s its own antiparticle
    In a discovery that concludes an 80-year quest, researchers found evidence of particles that are their own antiparticles. These 'Majorana fermions' could one day help make quantum computers more robust. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • 3-D imaging of surface chemistry in confinement
    An optical imaging tool has been developed to visualize surface chemistry in real time. Researchers imaged the interfacial chemistry in the microscopically confined geometry of a simple glass micro-capillary. The glass is covered with hydroxyl (-OH) groups that can lose a proton -- a much-studied chemical reaction that is important ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Molecular ‚pulleys‘ improve battery performance
    Scientists have reported a molecular pulley binder for high-capacity silicon anodes of lithium ion batteries. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Paying people to protect forests is worth it
    A new study suggests that paying people to conserve their trees could be a highly cost-effective way to reduce deforestation and carbon emissions and should be a key part of the global strategy to fight climate change. The study sought to evaluate how effective 'Payments for Ecosystems' (PES) is at ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Faulty support cells disrupt communication in brains of people with schizophrenia
    New research has identified the culprit behind the wiring problems in the brains of people with schizophrenia. When researchers transplanted human brain cells generated from individuals diagnosed with childhood-onset schizophrenia into mice, the animal's nerve cell networks did not mature properly and the mice exhibited the same anti-social and anxious ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Genetic predisposition to breast cancer due to non-BRCA mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish women
    Genetic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jewish women. A new article pexamines the likelihood of carrying another cancer-predisposing mutation in BRCA1, BRCA2 or another breast cancer gene among women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry with breast cancer who do not carry ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Laser treatment reduces eye floaters
    Patients reported improvement in symptoms of eye floaters after treatment with a laser, according to a new study. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Is mental health associated with perception of nasal function?
    A study of preoperative patients for rhinoplasty suggests poor mental well-being and low self-esteem were associated with poorer perceptions of nasal function, according to a new study published by JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Use of cognitive abilities to care for grandkids may have driven evolution of menopause
    Instead of having more children, a grandmother may pass on her genes more successfully by using her cognitive abilities to directly or indirectly aid her existing children and grandchildren. Such an advantage could have driven the evolution of menopause in humans. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Google searches can be used to track dengue in underdeveloped countries
    An analytical tool that combines Google search data with government-provided clinical data can quickly and accurately track dengue fever in less-developed countries. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Elephant seals recognize each other by the rhythm of their calls
    Every day, humans pick up on idiosyncrasies such as slow drawls, high-pitched squeaks, or hints of accents to put names to voices from afar. This ability may not be as unique as once thought, researchers report. They find that unlike all other non-human mammals, northern elephant seal males consider the ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Crustal limestone platforms feed carbon to many of Earth’s arc volcanoes
    A new analysis suggests that much of the carbon released from volcanic arcs, chains of volcanoes that arise along the tectonic plates of a subduction zone, comes from remobilizing limestone reservoirs in the Earth's crust. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Paying cash for carbon, making dogs friendly, and destroying all life on Earth
    This week we have stories on the genes that may make dogs friendly, why midsized animals are the fastest, and what it would take to destroy all the life on our planet with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks to Seema Jayachandran about paying cash to Ugandan farmers ... read more
    Source: Science Magazine PodcastVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • In making decisions, are you an ant or a grasshopper?
    New findings add to a growing body of evidence that, although it may seem less appealing, the ant's gratification-delaying strategy should not be viewed in a negative light. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Cow antibodies yield important clues for developing a broadly effective AIDS vaccine
    The elicitation of powerful, HIV-blocking antibodies in cows in a matter of weeks -- a process that usually takes years in humans -- has now been described by researchers. The unexpected animal model is providing clues for important questions at a moment when new energy has infused HIV vaccine research. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Scientists discover combined sensory map for heat, humidity in fly brain
    Neuroscientists now can visualize how fruit flies sense and process humidity and temperature together through a 'sensory map' within their brains, according to new research. The findings could one day help researchers better understand how the human brain simultaneously processes humidity and temperature and might influence how humans control for ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Viewing Martian moon orbiting the red planet
    While photographing Mars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured a cameo appearance of the tiny moon Phobos on its trek around the Red Planet. Hubble took 13 separate exposures over 22 minutes to create a time-lapse video showing the moon's orbital path. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Innate reaction of hematopoietic stem cells to severe infections
    For the first time, researchers have shown that hematopoietic stem cells detect infectious agents themselves and begin to divide – that is, without signals from growth factors. This direct production of defensive cells damages hematopoiesis in the long term, however, which could lead to malignant hematopoietic stem cell diseases at ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Watch elephant seals recognize each other’s ‘accents’
    Animals know the rhythm of their rivals’ calls ... read more
    Source: Latest News from Science MagazineVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Aboriginal community with strong ethno-cultural identity and connection to the land has lower suicide rates
    A new study investigating mental health perceptions and practices of an aboriginal community in northern Ontario, and its significantly lower rates of mental health services utilization and suicide, suggests that a strong ethno-cultural identity and connection to the land are significant factors to positive mental health outcomes in this region. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Molting feathers may help birds deal with environmental contaminants
    Mercury is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant that affects the health of birds and other wild animals. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • A healthy lifestyle increases life expectancy by up to seven years
    Maintaining a normal weight, not smoking, and drinking alcohol at moderate levels are factors that add healthy years to life. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Molecular changes with age in normal breast tissue are linked to cancer-related changes
    New research provides insight into how changes that occur with age may predispose breast tissue cells to becoming cancerous. Specifically, the study demonstrates that regions in the genome where DNA methylation changes occur with age are particularly sensitive to disruption in cancer. This new data provides insight into how certain ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Search and rescue dogs do their jobs despite travel stress
    When disaster strikes, you want the very best tools, functioning at their peak. In the case of catastrophic earthquakes, tornadoes, or even bombings in war zones, those tools are search and rescue dogs. But researchers have found that getting dogs to disaster sites can add to the animals' stress. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Could sharks help save shipping industry billions?
    Whales, sharks, butterflies and lotus leaves might together hold the secret to saving the shipping industry millions and help save the planet, according to a marine biologist. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Heart cell’s response to dwindling oxygen predicted
    A model that predicts a single heart cell's response to dwindling supplies of oxygen has been developed by researchers. Specifically, it evaluates a cell's ability to keep producing ATP -- a cell's primary fuel source -- and stay alive, even as it is increasingly deprived of oxygen. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Using a pig model to study chronic diseases may help minimize drug failure rate
    Scientists may be able to minimize the failure rate of drugs for diseases linked to high-calorie diets, such as colon cancer and type 2 diabetes, if they test treatments using a pig model, according to an international team of researchers. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Want to win at sports? Take a cue from these mighty mice
    As student athletes hit training fields this summer to gain the competitive edge, a new study shows how the experiences of a tiny mouse can put them on the path to winning. Scientists examined how surges of testosterone both before and after aggressive encounters led the male California mouse to ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Spiral arms allow school children to weigh black holes
    Astronomers have provided a way for armchair astronomers, and even primary school children, to merely look at a spiral galaxy and estimate the mass of its hidden, central black hole. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Parents have critical role in preventing teen drinking
    Fewer Australian teenagers are drinking alcohol but more needs to be done to curb the drinking habits of Aussie students, based on the findings of the latest study. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Art therapy best practices for children with autism
    A researcher is working with art therapists to find better ways to treat children who have Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Researchers were able to develop a set of guidelines for delivering art therapy to children who have ASD. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Novel 3-D printing process strengthens parts by 275 percent
    A new way to make 3-D printed parts stronger and immediately useful in real-world applications has been revealed by researchers. They applied the traditional welding concepts to bond the submillimeter layers in a 3-D printed part together, while in a microwave. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Semiliquid chains pulled out of a sea of microparticles
    An electrode brought to the surface of a liquid that contains microparticles can be used to pull out surprisingly long chains of particles. Curiously enough, the particles in the chains are held together by a thin layer of liquid that covers them. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • 3-D printing sweeps toy manufacturing off the shelves
    People have scoffed that 3-D printers are simply toys themselves. But they probably didn't realize how much money is made off playthings. Do-it-yourself manufacturing -- making goods at home with a 3-D printer using open source designs from a free online repository -- has a multi-million-dollar impact on the overall ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • A changing society: 100 is the new 80
    When it comes to aging successfully and remaining in good health, are centenarians the perfect role models? Researchers have been studying illness trajectories in centenarians during the final years of their lives. According to their findings, people who died aged 100 or older suffered fewer diseases than those who died ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Taste and health affect consumer choices for milk and nondairy beverages
    To learn more about what affects consumer decisions regarding fluid milk purchases, researchers used surveys, conjoint analysis, and means-end-chain analysis to uncover the underlying values among dairy milk and nondairy beverage consumers. The results of the study highlighted the most important factors for both milk and nondairy beverages, which were ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Cucumbers in space provide insights on root growth
    Scientists have untangled the competing influences of water and gravity on plant roots -- by growing cucumbers during spaceflight. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Day-to-day experiences affect awareness of aging, mood
    A study of older adults finds an individual's awareness of aging is not as static as previously thought, and that day-to-day experiences and one's attitude toward aging can affect an individual's awareness of age-related change -- and how that awareness affects one's mood. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Heart health: A sodium surprise
    Irregular heartbeat -- or arrhythmia -- can have sudden and often fatal consequences. A biomedical engineering team examining molecular behavior in cardiac tissue recently made a surprising discovery that could someday impact treatment of the life-threatening condition. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Grasslands restoration is working in the soil, too
    A new study finds that tallgrass prairie restoration at a large Illinois preserve is working at a foundational level -- in the soil. Bacteria in the soil are recolonizing and recovering on their own to resemble soil found in remnant prairies. The study shows that a carefully managed restoration can ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Heritage and ancient grain project feeds a growing demand
    After a century of markets dominated by a few types of wheat and white flour, ancient and heritage wheat varieties are making a comeback. Restaurants and bakeries that promote organic and local agriculture have sprouted up across the country in the last decade, meeting a rising consumer demand for tasty ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Hot dogs: Is climate change impacting populations of African wild dogs?
    Climate change may be harming the future of African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) by impacting the survival rates of pups, according to one of the first studies on how shifting temperatures are impacting tropical species. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017
  • Perceiving oneself as less physically active than peers is linked to a shorter lifespan
    American adults who believed that they were less active than their peers died younger than those who believed they were more active -- even if their actual activity levels were similar, research shows. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-07-2017