Science News

  • People who ‚hear voices‘ can detect hidden speech in unusual sounds
    People who hear voices that other people can't hear may use unusual skills when their brains process new sounds, according to new research. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 21-08-2017
  • Licorice is a hot trend in hot flashes, but could interact with medications
    Licorice roots have a flavorful history, having been used in ancient Egyptian teas and in traditional Chinese medicines, all the way to today as a flavoring agent and candy. And some women now take licorice extracts as supplements to treat menopausal symptoms. But scientists caution that licorice could pose a ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 21-08-2017
  • Avocado seed husks could be a gold mine of medicinal and industrial compounds
    In a first-of-its-kind study, scientists report that avocado seed husks, which are usually discarded along with the seed, contain a plethora of useful chemical compounds. They say these compounds could eventually be used to treat a host of debilitating diseases, as well as to enhance the allure of cosmetics, perfumes ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 21-08-2017
  • Entfesselte Magnetkraft
    Die Flecken auf der Oberfläche unserer Sonne zeugen von der Aktivität in ihrem Innern ... read more
    Source: Max-Planck-Gesellschaft – ForschungVeröffentlicht am 21-08-2017
  • Negotiating positions through reflexivity in international fieldwork
    International Social Work, Ahead of Print. ... read more
    Source: International Social Work RSS feed — OnlineFirst ArticlesVeröffentlicht am 21-08-2017
  • Smart labels could tell you when to toss food and makeup, as this video shows
    The labels can be printed in large quantities and added to food and cosmetics packaging, the scientists say ... read more
    Source: Latest News from Science MagazineVeröffentlicht am 21-08-2017
  • Energized fabrics could keep soldiers warm and battle-ready in frigid climates
    Soldiering in arctic conditions is tough. Protective clothing can be heavy and can cause overheating and sweating, while hands and feet can grow numb. To keep military personnel more comfortable, scientists are trying to create high-tech fabrics that heat up when powered and that capture sweat. These fabrics could conceivably ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-08-2017
  • Testing TVs and tablets for ‚green‘ screens
    Today, researchers report preliminary results suggesting that under simulated landfill conditions, quantum dots can leach out of TVs and tablets. But because this happens in such tiny amounts, the team says that in the grand scheme of things, it might make sense to use the more toxic quantum dots that ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-08-2017
  • No guts no glory: Harvesting the microbiome of athletes
    Scientists have tapped into the microbiome of elite runners and rowers, and have identified particular bacteria that may aid athletic performance. The goal is to develop probiotic supplements that may help athletes -- and even amateur fitness enthusiasts -- recover from a tough workout or more efficiently convert nutrients to ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-08-2017
  • Silk could improve sensitivity, flexibility of wearable body sensors
    From smart socks to workout clothes that measure exertion, wearable body sensors are becoming the latest 'must-have' technology. Now scientists report they are on the cusp of using silk, one of the world's most coveted fabrics, to develop a more sensitive and flexible generation of these multi-purpose devices that monitor ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-08-2017
  • Mussel-inspired glue could one day make fetal surgery safer
    Whether to perform surgery on a fetus is a heart-wrenching decision. This type of surgery involves penetrating the delicate amniotic sac, increasing health risks to the fetus. Now researchers report the development of a glue, inspired by the tenacious grip of mussels on slippery rocks, that could one day help ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-08-2017
  • Sugars in human mother’s milk are new class of antibacterial agents
    A new study has found that sugars in mother's' milk do not just provide nutrition for babies but also help protect them from bacterial infections, making them a new class of antimicrobial agent. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 20-08-2017
  • Novel approach to track HIV infection
    Scientists used a novel live-cell fluorescent imaging system that allowed them for the first time to identify individual viral particles associated with HIV infection. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 19-08-2017
  • Seeking the secret ingredient in the original smallpox vaccine
    Thanks to a secret vaccine ingredient as well as a net of worldwide researchers and successful vaccination campaigns, smallpox was finally eradicated in 1977. A new study provides an in-depth investigation of the mysteries associated with the development of smallpox vaccine and is a rich and interesting account of how ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 19-08-2017
  • New Bioimaging technique is fast and economical
    A new approach to optical imaging makes it possible to quickly and economically monitor multiple molecular interactions in a large area of living tissue -- such as an organ or a small animal; technology that could have applications in medical diagnosis, guided surgery, or pre-clinical drug testing. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • To reduce postoperative pain, consider sleep — and caffeine
    A new preclinical study found that a brief period of extended wakefulness before surgery enhances pain and prolongs recovery time after surgery. Caffeine administration helped to reduce the harmful effects of sleep loss on subsequent surgical pain. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Astrophysicist predicts detached, eclipsing white dwarfs to merge into exotic star
    Astrophysicists have discovered two detached, eclipsing double white dwarf binaries with orbital periods of 40 and 46 minutes, respectively. White dwarfs are the remnants of Sun-like stars, many of which are found in pairs, or binaries. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Ocean channel in Bahamas marks genetic divide in Brazilian free-tailed bats
    Brazilian free-tailed bats are expert flyers, capable of migrating hundreds of miles and regularly traveling more than 30 miles a night. But they pull up short at a narrow ocean channel that cuts across the Bahamas, dividing bat populations that last shared an ancestor hundreds of thousands of years ago. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Eclipse research: Following in the moon’s slipstream to capture high-res sunspot images
    While much of the research around the eclipse on Monday will focus on the effects of the Sun's brief, daytime disappearance on Earth and its atmosphere, a group of solar physicists will be leveraging the rare event to capture a better glimpse of the star itself. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Study of California kidney cancer shows declining incidence, end of a trend
    A study of kidney cancer incidence in California over 25 years is the first report to demonstrate that the rising rate of kidney cancer seen in the US over the past two decades may have ended. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Multiple-wavelength neutron holography with pulsed neutrons
    Local structures around impurities in solids provide important information for understanding the mechanisms of material functions, because most of them are controlled by dopants. For this purpose, the x-ray absorption fine structure method, which provides radial distribution functions around specific elements, is most widely used. However, a similar method using ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Identifying time scales for violation/preservation of Stokes-Einstein relation in supercooled water
    The violation of the Stokes-Einstein (SE) relation D ~ (/T)–1 between the shear viscosity and the translational diffusion constant D at temperature T is of great importance for characterizing anomalous dynamics of supercooled water. Determining which time scales play key roles in the SE violation remains elusive without the measurement ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Mach-Zehnder interferometry using spin- and valley-polarized quantum Hall edge states in graphene
    Confined to a two-dimensional plane, electrons in a strong magnetic field travel along the edge in one-dimensional quantum Hall channels that are protected against backscattering. These channels can be used as solid-state analogs of monochromatic beams of light, providing a unique platform for studying electron interference. Electron interferometry is regarded ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Correlation-induced superconductivity dynamically stabilized and enhanced by laser irradiation
    Studies on out-of-equilibrium dynamics have paved a way to realize a new state of matter. Superconductor-like properties above room temperatures recently suggested to be in copper oxides achieved by selectively exciting vibrational phonon modes by laser have inspired studies on an alternative and general strategy to be pursued for high-temperature ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • High-density array of ferroelectric nanodots with robust and reversibly switchable topological domain states
    The exotic topological domains in ferroelectrics and multiferroics have attracted extensive interest in recent years due to their novel functionalities and potential applications in nanoelectronic devices. One of the key challenges for these applications is a realization of robust yet reversibly switchable nanoscale topological domain states with high density, wherein ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Liquid crystalline cellulose-based nematogels
    Physical properties of composite materials can be pre-engineered by controlling their structure and composition at the mesoscale. However, approaches to achieving this are limited and rarely scalable. We introduce a new breed of self-assembled nematogels formed by an orientationally ordered network of thin cellulose nanofibers infiltrated with a thermotropic nematic ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Crystallization-induced emission enhancement: A novel fluorescent Au-Ag bimetallic nanocluster with precise atomic structure
    We report the first noble metal nanocluster with a formula of Au4Ag13(DPPM)3(SR)9 exhibiting crystallization-induced emission enhancement (CIEE), where DPPM denotes bis(diphenylphosphino)methane and HSR denotes 2,5-dimethylbenzenethiol. The precise atomic structure is determined by x-ray crystallography. The crystalline state of Au4Ag13 shows strong luminescence at 695 nm, in striking contrast to the ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Probing topology by „heating“: Quantized circular dichroism in ultracold atoms
    We reveal an intriguing manifestation of topology, which appears in the depletion rate of topological states of matter in response to an external drive. This phenomenon is presented by analyzing the response of a generic two-dimensional (2D) Chern insulator subjected to a circular time-periodic perturbation. Because of the system’s chiral ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Tunable chiral metal organic frameworks toward visible light-driven asymmetric catalysis
    A simple and effective strategy is developed to realize visible light–driven heterogeneous asymmetric catalysis. A chiral organic molecule, which only has very weak catalytic activity in asymmetric α-alkylation of aldehydes under visible light, is utilized as the ligand to coordinate with different types of metal ions, including Zn2+, Zr4+, and ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Can Twitter aid disaster response? New research examines how
    With over 500 million tweets sent every single day, new research is investigating innovative ways to use that data to help communities respond during unexpected catastrophes. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • How immature cells grow up to be red blood cells
    Researchers have identified the mechanism behind red blood cell specialization and revealed that it is controlled by an enzyme called UBE2O. This finding could spark the development of new treatments for blood disorders and cancers. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Quick and easy way to shut down instabilities in fusion devices
    Scientists have discovered a remarkably simple way to suppress a common instability that can halt fusion reactions and damage the walls of reactors built to create a "star in a jar." ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Hot spot at Hawaii? Not so fast
    Geophysicists use a new model to conclude that volcanic hot spots around the globe aren't moving as fast as recently thought. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Despite benefits, half of parents against later school start times
    Leading pediatrics and sleep associations agree: Teens shouldn't start school so early. Yet recent research finds parents are split almost down the middle on whether they support delays in school start times that might permit their 13- to 17-year-olds to sleep later on school days. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Smokers 20 percent more likely to quit when cigarettes cost $1 more
    Smokers were found to be 20 percent more likely to quit smoking when packs of cigarettes cost just one dollar more, according to a new public health study. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Umbreon or Antumbra? Can you tell the difference between eclipse terms and Pokémon lingo?
    Astronomy terms and monster names sound surprisingly similar ... read more
    Source: Latest News from Science MagazineVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Mineral layer around avian flu pathogen may be the cause for human infections
    Avian flu can be transmitted from birds to humans; transmission among humans, however, is limited. The reason may be an eggshell-like mineral layer that the virus acquires due to the high calcium concentration in the intestines of birds. These mineralized viruses are significantly more infectious and, in addition, more robust ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • The power of perovskite
    Researchers improve perovskite-based technology in the entire energy cycle, from solar cells harnessing power to LED diodes to light the screens of future electronic devices and other lighting applications. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Cheesemaking secret unlocked
    Researchers say their new knowledge on the inner workings of a bacterium has important implications for Australia's billion dollar cheese industry. The research group has explained the regulation of an enzyme in the bacterium Lactococcus, which is used as a starter culture in cheese production. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Mechanisms explaining positional diversity of the hindlimb in tetrapod evolution
    Elucidating how body parts in their earliest recognizable form are assembled in tetrapods during development is essential for understanding the nature of morphological evolution. Researchers found in eight tetrapod species that the position of the sacral vertebrae and the hindlimbs is determined by the initiation timing of Gdf11 gene expression. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Rebutting the claim that antidepressants do not work
    A theory that has gained considerable attention in international media suggest that antidepressant drugs, such as the SSRIs, do not exert any actual antidepressant effect. A research group has now analyzed data from clinical trials and can rebut this theory. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • How whip-like cell appendages promote bodily fluid flow
    Researchers have revealed that a molecule called Daple is essential for the correct orientation and coordinated beating of cilia on the surface of cells lining ventricles in the brain. Without Daple, the cilia develop a random arrangement and cannot produce a uniform flow of CSF. This in turn leads to ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Flexibility at work key to helping women maintain careers after childbirth
    Flexibility in the workplace is the key to helping women maintain their career trajectory after childbirth, new research has shown. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Artificial neural networks decode brain activity during performed and imagined movements
    Filtering information for search engines, acting as an opponent during a board game or recognizing images: Artificial intelligence has far outpaced human intelligence in certain tasks. Researchers are showing how ideas from computer science could revolutionize brain research. They illustrate how a self-learning algorithm decodes human brain signals that were ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Organ crosstalk: Fatty liver can cause damage to other organs
    Scientists have discovered that a fatty liver can cause damage to other organs. They demonstrate the effects of fatty liver disease on the function of the hormone-producing islet cells in the pancreas and on renal function. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Population health impact of infants born small for gestational age in low- and middle-income countries
    Researchers have used the first international, multi-ethnic birth weight standard, known as the INTERGROWTH-21st, to describe the global burden of suboptimal fetal growth. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Mitochondria: A map of the cell’s powerhouse
    Researchers are mapping the distribution of all proteins in mitochondria for the first time. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Data revealed under FOI shows benefits of MS drug currently blocked by regulators
    A drug that is blocked by the EU regulatory system has now been found to improve the quality of life of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Lasers used to detect risk of heart attack and stroke
    Patients at risk of heart attacks and strokes may be spotted earlier thanks to a diagnosis tool that uses near-infrared light to identify high-risk arterial plaques. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017
  • Why whisky tastes better when diluted with water
    There is a reason why whisky is diluted with water before being bottled. The same reason also makes many whisky enthusiasts add a few drops of water in their glasses – it makes the whisky taste better. But why is this so? Researchers have now presented an answer to this ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 18-08-2017