Science News

  • Widowhood practices and impacts on women in Sub-Saharan Africa: An empowerment perspective
    International Social Work, Ahead of Print. ... read more
    Source: International Social Work RSS feed — OnlineFirst ArticlesVeröffentlicht am 26-04-2017
  • Hornig, Lipkin and chronic fatigue syndrome again
    Drs Mady Hornig and Ian Lipkin once again provide some fodder for this blog, continuing one of their important research themes on how chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) (sometimes also referred to as myalgic encephalomyelitis, ME) might show some important immune-related issues [1].This research tag-team and the teams of dedicated scientists who ... read more
    Source: Research-Blogging EnglishVeröffentlicht am 26-04-2017
  • Afghanistan and Iraq veterans‘ opioid use similar to that of civilians
    Opioid use among Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation New Dawn veterans is roughly comparable to that of the general US population, suggests new research. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Is climate change responsible for record-setting extreme weather events?
    After an unusually intense heat wave, downpour or drought, climate scientists inevitably receive phone calls and emails asking whether human-caused climate change played a role. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • With synthetic mucus, researchers take aim at antibiotic resistance
    The human body produces about a gallon of mucus per day. By studying and replicating mucus’ natural ability to control pathogenic bacteria, scientists hope to find new methods for combatting infections and antibiotic resistance. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Cassini completes final — and fateful — Titan flyby: Dive to Saturn next
    NASA's Cassini spacecraft has had its last close brush with Saturn's hazy moon Titan and is now beginning its final set of 22 orbits around the ringed planet. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • ‚Unicorn‘ shipworm could reveal clues about human medicine, bacterial infections
    A dark slithering creature four feet long that dwells in the foul mud of a remote lagoon in the Philippines has been discovered by researchers. They say studying the animal, a giant shipworm with pinkish siphons at one end and an eyeless head at the other, could add to our ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Genes associated with resilience against brain pathology identified
    Researchers have discovered two genes, known as UNC5C and ENC1, that are associated with aging individuals having better memory and brain function than would be expected, given the amount of pathologies that accumulated in their brains. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Tumor marker for aggressive ovarian cancer identified
    Patients who expressed the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 had more aggressive cancers and were more likely to die early from their disease, according to a large study. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Cold weather linked to mortality risks in Texas, research shows
    Cold weather increases the risk of mortality in Texas residents, according to researchers. In the state's 12 major metro areas from 1990 to 2011, researchers found that cold temperatures significantly increased the risk of mortality by up to 5 percent with a 1 degree Celsius decrease in temperature in the ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • A pilot study of deep brain stimulation in treatment-resistant schizophrenia
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has proven its effectiveness in different types of psychiatric disorders, neuropathic pain and neurodegenerative diseases. Schizophrenia remains one of the leading causes of disability worldwide, with 30 percent of the patients' refractory to the treatment. Study authors hypothesized that DBS may be an effective treatment in ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Vitamin a and a high-fat diet increasing risk for obesity, diabetes
    Vitamin A is an essential nutrient that the human body needs to function properly. But new research suggests that normal levels of vitamin A within a high-fat diet can negatively affect expression of liver genes associated with glucose and fat metabolism. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Intense training without proper recovery may compromise bone health in elite rowers
    Bone mineral density, an indicator of bone strength, typically increases with regular exercise, acting as a protective mechanism against bone fractures and osteoporosis. But a new study suggests that the extended, high-intensity training sessions of elite athletes could reverse beneficial bone changes. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • One step closer to an ‚exercise pill‘
    Studies show obese people produce elevated levels of a protein called myostatin. A new study shows suppressing myostatin enhanced muscle mass and dramatically improved markers of heart and kidney health in mice, suggesting a promising avenue for new drugs to counter obesity. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Scientists unravel how protein impacts intellectual disability
    A protein helps balance nerve cell communication, scientists have shown in a new study. This new study could have implications for potential treatments of intellectual disability and other neurodevelopmental disorders. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Ancient stress response provides clues to cancer resistance
    Cancer cells deploy an ancient mechanism used by single-celled organisms to elevate their mutation rate in response to stress. This discovery explains one of the best-known hallmarks of cancer -- its high mutation rate, which contributes to the rapid evolution of drug resistance. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Religious people more likely to oppose reproductive technologies
    As new and more effective human reproductive genetic technologies develop, people of faith are more likely to disapprove of these tools than nonreligious people, a new study found. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Childhood obesity quadruples risk of developing type 2 diabetes
    Children with obesity face four times the risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared to children with a body mass index (BMI) in the normal range, according to a new study. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • What’s coming next? Scientists identify how the brain predicts speech
    A new study has shed light on how the brain helps us to predict what is coming next in speech. Their research reveals how individual neurons coordinate with neural populations to anticipate events, a process that is impaired in many neurological and psychiatric disorders such as dyslexia, schizophrenia and Attention ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Bugs for thought: Gut bacteria tell the brain what animals should eat?
    Could the bacteria that inhabit our gut influence our food choices? A new study shows, for the first time, that this idea may not be as far-fetched as it seems. Neuroscientists have discovered that gut bacteria 'speak' with the brain to control food choices in animals. They identified two species ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Overfishing in one of world’s most productive fishing regions, new study suggests
    Scientists used images from satellites and flyovers to count the number of small boats, or pangas, to find that fishing in Gulf of California, which separates Baja California and mainland Mexico, is over capacity. The analysis suggests that future investment in the region's fisheries may not be economically or ecologically ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Thought Antarctica’s biodiversity was doing well? Think again
    Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are not in better environmental shape than the rest of the world. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Estrogen alters memory circuit function in women with gene variant
    Fluctuations in estrogen triggered atypical functioning in a key brain memory circuit in women with a common version of a gene. Brain scans revealed altered circuit activity linked to changes in the sex hormone in women with the gene variant while they performed a working memory task. The findings may ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • New method addresses reproducibility in computational experiments
    Scientists have developed a workflow management system that addresses irreproducibility when analyzing large genomics datasets with computers. Nextflow contributes to establishing good scientific practices and provides an important framework for those research projects where the analysis of large datasets are used to take decisions, for example, in precision medicine. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Political left, right similarly motivated to avoid rival views
    People on both sides of the political aisle are similarly motivated to dismiss monetary enticements in order to distance themselves from hearing or reading opposing ideals and information, new research reveals. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • ‚Diet‘ products can make you fat, study shows
    High-fat foods are often the primary target when fighting obesity, but sugar-laden 'diet' foods could be contributing to unwanted weight gain as well. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • India’s outsized coal plans would wipe out Paris climate goals
    India will not be able to meet its Paris climate agreement commitments in the coming years if it carries through with plans to construct nearly 370 coal-fired power plants, according to researchers. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Managing disease spread through accessible modeling
    A new computer modeling study is aimed at making epidemiological models more accessible and useful for public-health collaborators and improving disease-related decision making. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • The fast and the crashed: Collisions five times more likely for street racers
    Ontarians who have street-raced at least once in the past year are five times more likely than other drivers to have crashed their vehicle at some point during those 12 months. This is the first Canadian survey to look systematically at the demographics and crash rates of adult street racers ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Fighting infections with a silver sword
    Silver has been used to fight infections since ancient times. Today, researchers are using sophisticated techniques such as the gene-editing platform Crispr-Cas9 to take a closer look at how silver poisons pathogens. The work is yielding new insights on how to create effective antimicrobials and avoid the pitfalls of antimicrobial ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • No biochar benefit for temperate zone crops, says new report
    Scientists believe that biochar, the partially burned remains of plants, has been used as fertilizer for at least 2,000 years in the Amazon Basin. Since initial studies published several years ago promoted biochar, farmers around the world have been using it as a soil additive to increase fertility and crop ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Chemical causes of battery ‚capacity fade‘ identified
    One of the major culprits in capacity fade of high-energy lithium-ion batteries has now been identified by a team of researchers. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Using 3-D weapons of science to fight infectious diseases
    Researchers have achieved a significant milestone in the effort to understand pathogens responsible for some of the world’s most deadly infectious diseases. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • High rate of tumor shrinkage among pancreatic cancer patients
    Adding cisplatin to standard gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel drug treatment provided a very high rate of tumor shrinkage for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, according to the results of a pilot clinical trial. These statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in overall response and survival rates resulted from a phase Ib/II clinical study. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Low-sodium diet might not lower blood pressure
    A new study that followed more than 2,600 men and women for 16 years found that consuming less sodium wasn't associated with lower blood pressure. The study adds to growing evidence that current recommendations for limiting sodium intake may be misguided. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Artificial intelligence may help diagnose tuberculosis in remote areas
    Researchers are training artificial intelligence models to identify tuberculosis (TB) on chest X-rays, which may help screening and evaluation efforts in TB-prevalent areas with limited access to radiologists, according to a new study. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Environmental enrichment triggers mouse wound repair response
    Living in a stimulating environment has a wide range of health benefits in humans and has even been shown to fight cancer in mice, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. A study now reveals that cognitive stimulation, social interactions, and physical activity increase lifespan in mice with colon cancer ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • The evolution of dog breeds now mapped
    When people migrate, Canis familiaris travels with them. Piecing together the details of those migrations has proved difficult because the clues are scattered across the genomes of hundreds of dog breeds. However, in a new report, researchers have used gene sequences from 161 modern breeds to assemble an evolutionary tree ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Researchers make tool for understanding cellular processes more useful
    Researchers have developed methods to use data from FRAP, an experiment used to study how molecules move inside cells, in ways it's never been used before. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Decrease in cardiovascular diseases benefits persons with diabetes
    The incidence of cardiovascular diseases in Sweden has decreased sharply since the late 1990s. This research included almost three million adult Swedes. In relative terms, the biggest winners are persons with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Ammonium nitrogen input increases the synthesis of anticarcinogenic compounds in broccoli
    In the quest for less contaminating fertilizing strategies, a study has explored the use of ammonium-based fertilizers, less widely used than the nitrate for fertilizing owing to the reduced growth displayed by the plants. The comparison between these two sources of nitrogen has revealed a higher amount of glucosinolates in ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • A novel form of iron for fortification of foods
    Whey protein nanofibrils loaded with iron nanoparticles. Now researchers are developing a new and highly effective way of fortifying iron into food and drinks. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Novel phage therapy saves patient with multidrug-resistant bacterial infection
    Scientists have successfully used an experimental therapy involving bacteriophages -- viruses that target and consume specific strains of bacteria -- to treat a patient near death from a multidrug-resistant bacterium. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • New survey hints at exotic origin for the Cold Spot
    A supervoid is unlikely to explain a 'Cold Spot' in the cosmic microwave background, according to the results of a new survey, leaving room for exotic explanations like a collision between universes. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Cognitive skills differ across cultures and generations
    An innovative study of children and parents in both Hong Kong and the United Kingdom reveals cultural differences in important cognitive skills among adolescents but not their parents. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • New interface allows more efficient, faster technique to remotely operate robots
    A new interface allows users to simply point and click on an item, then choose a grasp, to control a robot remotely. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Better dosing of meds: ‚Cyclops‘ algorithm spots daily rhythms in cells
    Humans, like virtually all other complex organisms on Earth, have adapted to their planet's 24-hour cycle of sunlight and darkness. That circadian rhythm is reflected in human behavior, of course, but also in the molecular workings of our cells. Now scientists have developed a powerful tool for detecting and characterizing ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Post-fracture care: Do we need to educate patients rather than doctors?
    This multicenter, randomized controlled trial involved 436 women, aged 50-85 years, who had attended hospital for treatment of a fragility fracture of the wrist or upper arm. The intervention group received repeated oral and written information about fragility fractures and osteoporosis management by a case manager, who prompted the patients ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • Bad feelings can motivate cancer patients
    Feeling down is a common side effect of being diagnosed with cancer. Anxiety, guilt, and distress often come hand-in-hand with diagnosis and treatment. But a recent study shows that these seemingly negative emotions can actually be good for patients. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017
  • A more than 100% quantum step toward producing hydrogen fuel
    Efforts to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels are advancing on various significant fronts. Initiatives include research focused on more efficient production of gaseous hydrogen fuel by using solar energy to break water down into components of hydrogen and oxygen. Scientists have now reported a key breakthrough in the basic ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-04-2017