Science News

  • Making ferromagnets stronger by adding non-magnetic elements
    Magnetic materials can be functionalized through a thoroughly unlikely method, report researchers: by adding amounts of the virtually non-magnetic element scandium to a gadolinium-germanium alloy. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Genes, ozone, and autism
    Exposure to ozone in the environment puts individuals with high levels of genetic variation at an even higher risk for developing autism than would be expected just by adding the two risk factors together, a new analysis shows. The study is the first to look at the combined effects of ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Fully gapped superconductivity with no sign change in the prototypical heavy-fermion CeCu2Si2
    In exotic superconductors, including high-Tc copper oxides, the interactions mediating electron Cooper pairing are widely considered to have a magnetic rather than a conventional electron-phonon origin. Interest in this exotic pairing was initiated by the 1979 discovery of heavy-fermion superconductivity in CeCu2Si2, which exhibits strong antiferromagnetic fluctuations. A hallmark of ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • The effects of external cues on individual and collective behavior of shoaling fish
    Collective animal behavior is an emergent phenomenon arising from the local interactions of the members of animal groups. Considerable progress has been made in characterizing these interactions, particularly inferring rules that shape and guide the responses of animals to their near neighbors. To date, experimental work has focused on collective ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Nonvolatile ferroelectric domain wall memory
    Ferroelectric domain walls are atomically sharp topological defects that separate regions of uniform polarization. The discovery of electrical conductivity in specific types of walls gave rise to "domain wall nanoelectronics," a technology in which the wall (rather than the domain) stores information. This paradigm shift critically hinges on precise nanoengineering ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Electronic structure of aqueous solutions: Bridging the gap between theory and experiments
    Predicting the electronic properties of aqueous liquids has been a long-standing challenge for quantum mechanical methods. However, it is a crucial step in understanding and predicting the key role played by aqueous solutions and electrolytes in a wide variety of emerging energy and environmental technologies, including battery and photoelectrochemical cell ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Probing nanocrystalline grain dynamics in nanodevices
    Dynamical structural defects exist naturally in a wide variety of solids. They fluctuate temporally and hence can deteriorate the performance of many electronic devices. Thus far, the entities of these dynamic objects have been identified to be individual atoms. On the other hand, it is a long-standing question whether a ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Nanoscale simultaneous chemical and mechanical imaging via peak force infrared microscopy
    Nondestructive chemical and mechanical measurements of materials with ~10-nm spatial resolution together with topography provide rich information on the compositions and organizations of heterogeneous materials and nanoscale objects. However, multimodal nanoscale correlations are difficult to achieve because of the limitation on spatial resolution of optical microscopy and constraints from instrumental ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • High particulate iron(II) content in glacially sourced dusts enhances productivity of a model diatom
    Little is known about the bioavailability of iron (Fe) in natural dusts and the impact of dust mineralogy on Fe utilization by photosynthetic organisms. Variation in the supply of bioavailable Fe to the ocean has the potential to influence the global carbon cycle by modulating primary production in the Southern ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Above 400-K robust perpendicular ferromagnetic phase in a topological insulator
    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) that emerges under broken time-reversal symmetry in topological insulators (TIs) exhibits many fascinating physical properties for potential applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics. However, in transition metal–doped TIs, the only experimentally demonstrated QAHE system to date, the QAHE is lost at practically relevant temperatures. This ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • The mere presence of your smartphone reduces brain power, study shows
    Your cognitive capacity is significantly reduced when your smartphone is within reach — even if it’s off — suggests new research. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Fungal toxins easily become airborne, creating potential indoor health risk
    Toxins produced by three different species of fungus growing indoors on wallpaper may become aerosolized, and easily inhaled. The findings likely have implications for 'sick building syndrome. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Algorithm generates optimal origami folding patterns for any shape
    A new algorithm generates practical paper-folding patterns to produce any 3-D structure. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Bioengineers create more durable, versatile wearable for diabetes monitoring
    Researchers are getting more out of the sweat they've put into their work on a wearable diagnostic tool that measures three diabetes-related compounds in microscopic amounts of perspiration. In a study, the team describes their wearable diagnostic biosensor that can detect three interconnected compounds - cortisol, glucose and interleukin-6 - ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Anti-epilepsy drug restores normal brain activity in mild Alzheimer’s disease
    An anti-epileptic drug has been tested for its potential impact on the brain activity of patients with mild Alzheimer's disease. The team documented changes in patients' EEGs that suggest the drug could have a beneficial effect. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Leopard mothers show flexible child care
    Cubs leave home at various times ... read more
    Source: Latest News from Science MagazineVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Scientists recreate Californian Indian water bottles to study ancient exposure to chemicals
    Water bottles replicated in the traditional method used by Native Californian Indians reveal that the manufacturing process may have been detrimental to the health of these people. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Sweet bribes for ants are key to crops bearing fruit, study shows
    Some flowering crops, such as beans and cotton, carefully manage the amount and sweetness of nectar produced on their flowers and leaves, to recruit colonizing ants which deter herbivores. This strategy balances their needs for defense and reproduction. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Self-folding origami: Chemical programming allows Nafion sheets to fold and refold
    Plastic with a thousand faces: A single piece of Nafion foil makes it possible to produce a broad palette of complex 3-D structures. Researchers now describe how they use simple chemical 'programming' to induce the foil to fold itself using origami and kirigami principles. These folds can be repeatedly 'erased' ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • New ‘superglue’ could seal the deal for stretchable batteries, soft robots
    Hydrogel adhesive fuses hard-to-bond materials like elastics and hydrogels ... read more
    Source: Latest News from Science MagazineVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Scientists work to develop heat-resistant ‚cow of the future‘
    More than half the cattle in the world live in hot and humid environments, including about 40 percent of beef cows in the United States. By using genomic tools, researchers aim to produce an animal with superior ability to adapt to hot living conditions and produce top-quality beef. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Decades after the discovery of anti-obesity hormone, scant evidence that leptin keeps lean people lean, scientists say
    Decades after the discovery of anti-obesity hormone, scant evidence that leptin keeps lean people lean, scientists caution. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Leisure activities lower blood pressure in Alzheimer’s caregivers
    Going for a walk outside, reading, listening to music — these and other enjoyable activities can reduce blood pressure for elderly caregivers of spouses with Alzheimer’s disease, suggests a study. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Tropical viruses: Coming soon to Europe?
    The mosquito-borne viral disease Chikungunya is usually found in tropical areas. Researchers have now discovered how climate change is facilitating the spread of the Chikungunya virus. Even if climate change only progresses moderately – as scientists are currently observing – the risk of infection will continue to increase in many ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Meteorite mystery solved with research on high pressure
    A research group has found a long-sought explanation for the apparent contradictions implicit in the composition of lunar and Martian meteorites. They were able to demonstrate how meteorites could contain within narrow spaces minerals whose formation conditions are quite different. These findings provide new impetus for meteorite research. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Dune ecosystem modelling
    Acacia longifolia, which is native to Australia, is a species which was cultivated in Portugal primarily to stabilize dunes and as an ornamental plant; now it has spread out uncontrollably in Portugal and into many ecosystems around the world. Using the acacia as an example, researchers show that the location ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Equipping form with function
    Mechanical structures in steerable cars are optimized to fit exactly one particular shape of the toy. If designers want to reuse such a mechanism with different shapes, the necessary adjustments to the components were often unmanageable for non-experts. Scientists have developed an interactive design tool that allows users to easily ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Correct connections are crucial
    Investigators have been examining the use of deep brain stimulation in the treatment of Parkinson's disease in an attempt to optimize treatment effectiveness. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Child safety or parental duty: New study maps out core concepts in the vaccination debate
    The recent measles outbreak in Minnesota has been a sobering reminder of how highly concentrated populations of vaccination skeptics can elevate an entire community's risk of infection. Around the edges of every headline-grabbing outbreak, there's a vast range of opinions being circulated about the risks and benefits of early childhood ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Combined molecular biology test is the first to distinguish benign pancreatic lesions
    When performed in tandem, two molecular biology laboratory tests distinguish, with near certainty, pancreatic lesions that mimic early signs of cancer but are completely benign. The lesions almost never progress to cancer, so patients may be spared unnecessary pancreatic cancer screenings or operations. The two-test combination is the only one ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Turtle go-slow zone extensions needed
    Mmarine scientists are calling for an extension of go-slow zones in turtle habitats to reduce boat strikes on the threatened creatures. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Lowering health risks of cannabis use with new public health guidelines
    Canada's Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines, released with the endorsement of key medical and public health organizations, provide 10 science-based recommendations to enable cannabis users to reduce their health risks. The guidelines are based on a scientific review by an international team of experts. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Is it okay for children to count on their fingers?
    Is it OK for children to count on their fingers? Generations of pupils have been discouraged by their teachers from using their hands when learning maths. But a new research article shows using fingers may be a much more important part of maths learning than previously thought. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Tipping points are real: Gradual changes in CO2 levels can induce abrupt climate changes
    During the last glacial period, within only a few decades the influence of atmospheric CO2 on the North Atlantic circulation resulted in temperature increases of up to 10 degrees Celsius in Greenland -- as indicated by new climate calculations. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Following a friend leads to unsafe driving behavior
    A new study inspired by a court case involving a driver seriously hurt in an accident when following another car to a destination, provides evidence to show that the car behind makes risky driving maneuvers. Driving faster, more erratically, closer to the car in front and jumping traffic lights are ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Does dark matter annihilate quicker in the Milky Way?
    A new theory predicts how dark matter may be annihilating much more rapidly in the Milky Way, than in smaller or larger galaxies and the early Universe. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Existing drugs could benefit patients with bone cancer, genetic study suggests
    A subgroup of patients with osteosarcoma -- a form of bone cancer -- could be helped by an existing drug, suggest scientists. In the largest genetic sequencing study of osteosarcoma to date, scientists discovered that 10 percent of patients with a genetic mutation in particular growth factor signalling genes may ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Putting others first can cost lives in emergencies
    Selfless heroism isn't the best strategy in life-and-death disaster situations involving groups of people, a new study suggests. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Guided self-help approach to graded exercise program is safe, may reduce fatigue for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome
    A self-help approach to a graded exercise program, supervised by a specialist physiotherapist, is safe and may reduce fatigue for some people with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), according to a new trial of 200 people. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Out of africa: New research explores drive behind early humanity’s travels across the world
    A new research project starts this July after receiving a grant of over £450,000 from the Leverhulme Trust to explore the migrations of humans out of Africa. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • A unique amino acid for brain cancer therapy
    Photodynamic therapy is often used to treat brain tumors because of its specificity — it can target very small regions containing cancerous cells while sparing the normal cells around it from damage. It works by injecting a drug called a photosensitizer into the bloodstream, where it gathers in cells, and ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Plants sacrifice ‚daughters‘ to survive chilly weather
    Plants adopt different strategies to survive the changing temperatures of their natural environments. This is most evident in temperate regions where forest trees shed their leaves to conserve energy during the cold season. In a new study, a team of plant biologists found that some plants may selectively kill part ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Protein mingling under blue light
    One of the current challenges in biology is to understand rapidly-changing phenomena. Interestingly, only a small fraction of them is due to proteins acting in isolation, the majority of biological events are regulated by proteins acting together in clusters. Researchers have developed a new tool, called "CRY2clust", to trigger protein ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • U.S. energy secretary steps carefully around budgetmakers in Congress
    Rick Perry distances himself from Trump’s proposal for deep cuts at DOE ... read more
    Source: Latest News from Science MagazineVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • Top stories: How cats conquered the world, stratospheric balloons commercialized, and bird eggs explained
    This week’s top Science news ... read more
    Source: Latest News from Science MagazineVeröffentlicht am 23-06-2017
  • How a single chemical bond balances cells between life and death
    With SLAC's X-ray laser and synchrotron, scientists measured exactly how much energy goes into keeping a crucial chemical bond from triggering a cell's death spiral. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-06-2017
  • Heavy-drinking mothers linked to their child’s path toward the justice system
    A new study investigated whether children whose mothers had an alcohol-related disorder would be at risk of early-life contact with the justice system, which can lead to many negative outcomes across an individual's life span. Such outcomes can include repeated contact with the justice system, social disadvantages and marginalization, and ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-06-2017
  • Origins of Sun’s swirling spicules discovered
    For the first time, a computer simulation -- so detailed it took a full year to run -- shows how spicules form, helping scientists understand how spicules can break free of the sun's surface and surge upward so quickly. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-06-2017
  • Peroxisomal biogenesis disorder: New link to sugar metabolism
    Peroxisomal biogenesis disorder, which has been linked only to lipid metabolism, is also associated with sugar metabolism. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-06-2017
  • Spinal cord injury: Using cortical targets to improve motor function
    New research provides the first evidence that cortical targets could represent a novel therapeutic site for improving motor function in humans paralyzed by spinal cord injury. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-06-2017