Science News

  • Extreme Jupiter weather and magnetic fields
    New observations about the extreme conditions of Jupiter's weather and magnetic fields by astronomers have contributed to the revelations and insights coming from the first close passes of Jupiter by NASA's Juno mission. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Multiscale modeling reveals key events during early atherosclerotic plaque development
    A new computational modeling technique could indicate when atherosclerotic plaques will likely undergo rapid growth, reports a new study. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Mountain honey bees have ancient adaptation for high-altitude foraging
    Mountain-dwelling East African honey bees have distinct genetic variations compared to their savannah relatives that likely help them to survive at high altitudes, report researchers. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Viral protein may help chickenpox virus spread within the body
    The virus that causes chickenpox -- varicella zoster virus (VZV) -- possesses a protein that could enhance its ability to hijack white blood cells and spread throughout the body, according to new research. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • A new way to slow cancer cell growth
    Researchers have identified a new way to potentially slow the fast-growing cells that characterize all types of cancer. By removing a specific protein from cells, they were able to slow the cell cycle, which is out of control in cancer. The findings were made in kidney and cervical cancer cells ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Increased leaf abundance is a double-edged sword
    A new global assessment reveals that increases in leaf abundance are causing boreal areas to warm and arid regions to cool. The results suggest that recent changes in global vegetation have had impacts on local climates that should be considered in the design of local mitigation and adaptation plans. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • A flip switch for binge-eating?
    Researchers have identified a subgroup of neurons in the mouse brain that, upon activation, immediately prompt binge-like eating. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • The perils of publishing location data for endangered species
    While the increasing accessibility of data from scientific studies creates many benefits -- and represents a process that should be broadly embraced -- in the context of conserving endangered species it can actually be problematic, experts say. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Why the Sumatra earthquake was so severe
    An international team of scientists has found evidence suggesting the dehydration of minerals deep below the ocean floor influenced the severity of the Sumatra earthquake, which took place on Dec. 26, 2004. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • US nuclear regulators greatly underestimate potential for nuclear disaster
    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission relied on faulty analysis to justify its refusal to adopt a critical measure for protecting Americans from nuclear-waste fires at dozens of reactor sites around the country, according to a recent article. Radioactivity from such a fire could force approximately 8 million people to relocate ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Magnetic switch turns strange quantum property on and off
    A research team has developed the first switch that turns on and off a quantum behavior called the Berry phase. The discovery promises to provide new insight into the fundamentals of quantum theory and may lead to new quantum electronic devices. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Juno mission to Jupiter delivers first science results
    NASA's Juno mission is rewriting what scientists thought they knew about Jupiter specifically, and gas giants in general, according to a pair of Science papers released today. The Juno spacecraft has been in orbit around Jupiter since July 2016, passing within 3,000 miles of the equatorial cloudtops. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • The big star that couldn’t become a supernova
    For the first time in history, astronomers have been able to watch as a dying star was reborn as a black hole. It went out with a whimper instead of a bang. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • How whales got so big, sperm in space, and a first look at Jupiter’s poles
    This week we have stories on strange dimming at a not-so-distant star, sending sperm to the International Space Station, and what the fossil record tells us about how baleen whales got so ginormous with Online News Editor David Grimm. Julia Rosen talks to Scott Bolton about surprises in the first ... read more
    Source: Science Magazine PodcastVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Ancient genetic markers in sockeye salmon can help manage healthier fish stocks
    A recent study identifies new genetic markers in sockeye salmon that can help improve management of fish populations. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Preliminary: BRCA variations may work alongside COMT variation to reduce breast cancer
    Researchers find through looking at genetic data sets of presumed cancer-free women who carry BRCA 1/2 variants, the co-occurrence of a rare COMT genetic variant in some women. This research outlines a strategy for looking at large genetic data sets for clues as to why a genetic carrier may never ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Cellular stress in the brain may contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
    Research shows that cellular stress in the brain may contribute to development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Predicting threats to rainforests: New approach
    A new study highlights novel approaches to tackling deforestation. The team focused their research on Borneo, an island that has lost a staggering 30 percent of its forest since the 1970s and is among the most biodiverse and threatened on the planet. The loss of Bornean forests threatens species such ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Landscape-scale erosion instabilities in the northern Gabilan Mesa, California
    If you ever fly from L.A. to San Francisco, California, you may notice the Gabilan Mesa off to the east as you begin your descent into San Francisco International Airport. If you look carefully, you might notice two strange things: a series of bleach-white scars, where rock outcrops disrupt the ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • New species of bus-sized fossil marine reptile unearthed in Russia
    A new species of a fossil pliosaur (large predatory marine reptile from the 'age of dinosaur') has been found in Russia and profoundly change how we understand the evolution of the group, says an international team of scientists. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • How NSF cut 11% from its budget
    Agency officials say flexibility and protecting the core were the keys ... read more
    Source: Latest News from Science MagazineVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Marmoset monkeys learn to call the same way human infants learn to babble
    Human social groups have a strange tendency to share responsibility for taking care of infants; parents, older siblings, and other adult relatives all help to nurture babies. The only other primates that take care of infants this way are marmosets, a group of small, highly social monkeys from South America. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Ancient DNA evidence shows hunter-gatherers and farmers were intimately linked
    In human history, the transition from hunting and gathering to farming is a significant one. As such, hunter-gatherers and farmers are usually thought about as two entirely different sets of people. But researchers reporting new ancient DNA evidence show that in the area we now recognize as Romania, at least, ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Brain images reveal roots of kids‘ increasing cognitive control
    As children age into adolescence and on into young adulthood, they show dramatic improvements in their ability to control impulses, stay organized, and make decisions. Those 'executive functions' of the brain are key factors in determining outcomes, including educational success, drug use, and psychiatric illness. Now, researchers have mapped the ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • CRKL in 22q11.2; a key gene that contributes to common birth defects
    The research findings imply that patients with genitourinary birth defects due to 22q11.2 changes in gene dosage should also be evaluated for other potential birth defects seen in patients with DiGeorge syndrome that would affect the patient's future health. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • In fruit fly and human genetics, timing is everything
    Using fruit flies, researchers have discovered a cascade of molecular signals that program gene activity to drive the fly from one stage of maturation to the next, like a baby turning into an adult. Part of this programming involves alterations to the way DNA is packaged. Those alterations open certain ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Baby marmosets learn to ‘talk’ just like we do
    Find may shed light on evolution of human speech ... read more
    Source: Latest News from Science MagazineVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Size-sensing protein controls glucose uptake and storage in fat cells
    Researchers have discovered that a molecule which can sense the swelling of fat cells also controls a signaling pathway that allows fat cells to take up and store excess glucose. Mice missing this protein, known as SWELL1, gain less weight (fat) than normal mice on a high-fat diet, but also ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Two genetic variants in bicuspid aortic valve development
    Researchers report a key protein is affected during heart valve formation, in the first genome-wide study of bicuspid aortic valve. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Tai chi significantly reduces depression symptoms in Chinese-Americans
    A new study finds that a 12-week program of instruction and practice of the Chinese martial art tai chi led to significantly reduced symptoms of depression in Chinese-Americans not receiving any other treatments. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Solving the riddle of the snow globe
    A new study finds the sedimentation of asymmetric objects in liquid is very different from that of symmetrical objects like spheres. The research may have practical applications in improving water treatment and industrial processes. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Genetic risk factor for equine eye cancer identified
    A genetic mutation in horses has been identified that should help identify horses that are at risk for squamous cell carcinoma of the eye and enable horse owners to make informed breeding decisions. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Fathers‘ brains respond differently to daughters than sons
    Fathers with toddler daughters are more attentive and responsive to those daughters' needs than fathers with toddler sons are to the needs of those sons, according to brain scans and recordings of the parents' daily interactions with their kids. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Unveiling the quantum necklace
    The quantum world is both elegant and mysterious. It is a sphere of existence where the laws of physics experienced in everyday life are broken -- particles can exist in two places at once, they can react to each other over vast distances, and they themselves seem confused over whether ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Controlling 3-D behavior of biological cells using laser holographic techniques
    Scientists have developed an optical manipulation technique that can freely control the position, orientation, and shape of microscopic samples having complex shapes. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • New way to control light with electric fields
    Researchers have discovered a technique for controlling light with electric fields. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Safe space for illegal drug consumption in Baltimore would save $6 million a year
    $6 million in costs related to the opioid epidemic could be saved each year if a single 'safe consumption' space for illicit drug users were opened in Baltimore, a new cost-benefit analysis suggests. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Many patients with early-stage breast cancer receive costly, inappropriate testing
    A study shows that asymptomatic women who have been treated for early-stage breast cancer often undergo advanced imaging and other tests that provide little if any medical benefit, could have harmful effects and may increase their financial burden. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Ineffective antibiotics form strong teams against deadly super bacteria
    Combinations of three antibiotics -- that are each ineffective against superbugs when used alone -- are capable of eradicating two of the six ESKAPE pathogens when delivered together, scientists have discovered. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Scientists borrow from electronics to build circuits in living cells
    Synthetic biology researchers have demonstrated a new method for digital information processing in living cells, analogous to the logic gates used in electric circuits. The circuits are the largest ever published to date in eurkaryotic cells and a key step in harnessing the potential of cells as living computers that ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • High pressure key to lighter, stronger metal alloys, scientists find
    Subjecting complex metal mixtures called high-entropy alloys to extremely high pressures could lead to finer control over the arrangement of their atoms, which in turn can result in more desirable properties. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Designer worm spit supercharges healing
    Globally, every 30 seconds a diabetic has a limb amputated because of a non-healing wound. A molecule produced by a Thai liver parasite could be the solution to those non-healing wounds -- and scientists are now able to produce a version of the molecule on a large enough scale to ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • No evidence that brain-stimulation technique boosts cognitive training
    Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) -- a non-invasive technique for applying electric current to areas of the brain -- may be growing in popularity, but new research suggests that it probably does not add any meaningful benefit to cognitive training. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Jupiter’s skies are peppered with electron streams, ammonia plumes, and massive storms
    Latest Juno flyby reveals the planet also has magnetic fields 50% stronger in some areas than thought ... read more
    Source: Latest News from Science MagazineVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Call to keep secrets on rare species draws reluctant support
    Poachers often read research papers too ... read more
    Source: Latest News from Science MagazineVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • How whales got so big, sperm in space, and a first look at Jupiter’s poles
    On this week’s show: Fresh data from Jupiter and a roundup from the daily news site ... read more
    Source: Latest News from Science MagazineVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Blood heavy metal levels and autism (yet again)
    "Data showed that the children with ASD [autism spectrum disorder] had significantly (p < 0.001) higher levels of mercury and arsenic and a lower level of cadmium."And... "It is desirable to continue future research into the relationship between ASD and heavy metal exposure."Those sentences come from the study by Huamei Li and ... read more
    Source: Research-Blogging EnglishVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • Primzahllücken und hyperbolische Geometrie
    Ergebnisse über Summen und Differenzen von Primzahlen gelten ja immer ein wenig als Spielerei, weil sie keine wirkliche Bedeutung für die Zahlentheorie haben und es allenfalls die Methoden der Beweise sind, die sich auch in anderen Gebieten anwenden lassen. Insofern ist es bemerkenswert, dass ein gestern auf dem ArXiv erschienener ... read more
    Source: ResearchbloggingVeröffentlicht am 25-05-2017
  • From blue and black dresses to turbine blades, here’s the science of ‚fake fake‘ photographs
    A new study reveals the science behind a 'trick of the light' that made high-profile photographs of a major piece of public art appear 'faked' despite the pictures being entirely genuine. Vision science researchers found images of the 75-meter long wind turbine appeared super-imposed because of a visual illusion caused ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 24-05-2017
  • Helping plants pump iron
    Genetic variants have been identified that help plants grow in low-iron environments, which could improve crop yields, say researchers. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 24-05-2017