Wissenschafts-Weblogs

  • Researchers develop model for studying rare polio-like illness
    Scientists have developed the first animal model for studying paralysis caused by virus linked to a polio-like illness that paralyzed 120 children in 2014. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Understanding the impact of delays in high-speed networks
    In a world increasingly reliant on high-speed networks, introducing microsecond delays into such systems can have profound effects. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Computer bots are more like humans than you might think, having fights lasting years
    Bots appear to behave differently in culturally distinct online environments. A new paper says the findings are a warning to those using artificial intelligence for building autonomous vehicles, cyber security systems or for managing social media. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Ball-rolling bees reveal complex learning
    Bumblebees can be trained to score goals using a mini-ball, revealing unprecedented learning abilities. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Podcast: Cracking the smell code, why dinosaurs had wings before they could fly, and detecting guilty feelings in altruistic gestures
    This week, we chat about why people are nice to each other—does it feel good or are we just avoiding feeling bad—approaches to keeping arsenic out of the food supply, and using artificial intelligence to figure out what a chemical smells like to a human nose with Online News Editor ... read more
    Source: Science Magazine PodcastVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Values gap in workplace can lead millennials to look elsewhere
    Much has been made in popular culture about millennials as they join the working world, including their tendency to job hop. Although this behavior often is explained as a loyalty issue, new research reveals one reason young workers choose to leave a firm is because they find a disconnect between ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Global vaccine injury system needed to improve public health
    A global vaccine injury compensation system administered through the World Health Organization would address the global public health issue of vaccine injuries, experts argue. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Nematode resistance in soybeans beneficial even at low rates of infestation
    Soybeans with resistance to soybean cyst nematodes seem to have a yield advantage compared to susceptible varieties when SCN is present. Until now, scientists did not know what level of SCN infestation is needed to achieve the yield advantage. A new study shows that SCN resistance from the soybean accession ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Gene mutations cause leukemia, but which ones?
    New research sought to better understand one 'typo' in a standard leukemia assay, or test. The study, however, encountered a new problem: an issue with the model system itself. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Contact tracing and targeted insecticide spraying can curb dengue outbreaks
    Contact tracing -- a process of identifying everyone who has come into contact with those infected by a particular disease -- combined with targeted, indoor spraying of insecticide can greatly reduce the spread of the mosquito-borne dengue virus, finds a study. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Air pollution may have masked mid-20th Century sea ice loss
    Humans may have been altering Arctic sea ice longer than previously thought, according to researchers studying the effects of air pollution on sea ice growth in the mid-20th Century. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Vast luminous nebula poses a cosmic mystery
    Astronomers have found an enormous, glowing blob of gas in the distant universe, with no obvious source of power for the light it is emitting. Called an 'enormous Lyman-alpha nebula' (ELAN), it is the brightest and among the largest of these rare objects, only a handful of which have been ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • New link found between sex and viruses
    Sexual reproduction and viral infections both rely on a functionally identical protein, according to new research. The protein enables the fusion of two cells, such as a sperm cell and egg cell, or the fusion of a virus with a cell membrane. The discovery suggests that the protein evolved early ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Almost 4 decades later, mini eyeless catfish gets a name
    Discovered in a 1978-79 expedition, a pale, eyeless catfish that doesn't even measure an inch long is now known as Micromyzon orinoco, for the South American river in which it was discovered. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Fructose is generated in the human brain
    Fructose, a form of sugar linked to obesity and diabetes, is converted in the human brain from glucose, according to a new study. The finding raises questions about fructose's effects on the brain and eating behavior. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Removing barriers to early intervention for autistic children: A new model shows promise
    Acting on recommendations from the South Carolina Act Early Team, South Carolina changed its policies to pay for early intensive behavioral intervention in children under three revealed to be at high risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by a two-stage screening process. Previously, a formal diagnosis of ASD had been ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Tumor protein could hold key to pancreatic cancer survival
    A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is often a death sentence because current chemotherapies have little impact on the disease. In a new study, researchers were able to slow down growth and spread of tumors by targeting this protein in stellate cells in animal models, in combination with current chemotherapies. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Patients registered in a heart failure registry lived longer
    Heart failure patients registered in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry receive better medication and have a 35 percent lower risk of death than unregistered patients, according to a new study. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Sons of cocaine-using fathers have profound memory impairments
    Fathers who use cocaine at the time of conceiving a child may be putting their sons at risk of learning disabilities and memory loss. The researchers say the findings reveal that drug abuse by fathers -- separate from the well-established effects of cocaine use in mothers -- may negatively impact ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Trilobite eggs in New York
    Despite a plethora of exceptionally preserved trilobites, trilobite reproduction has remained a mystery. No previously described trilobite has had unambiguous eggs or genitalia preserved. A new study reports the first occurrence of in situ preserved trilobite eggs from the Lorraine Group in upstate New York, USA. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Anti-aging gene identified as a promising therapeutic target for older melanoma patients
    An anti-diabetic drug can inhibit the growth of melanoma in older patients by activating an anti-aging gene that in turn inhibits a protein involved in metastatic progression and resistance to targeted therapies for the disease, new research indicates. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Researchers use laser-generated bubbles to create 3-D images in liquid
    Researchers have developed a completely new type of display that creates 3-D images by using a laser to form tiny bubbles inside a liquid 'screen.' Instead of rendering a 3-D scene on a flat surface, the display itself is three-dimensional, a property known as volumetric. This allows viewers to see ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Direct-to-consumer genomics: Harmful or empowering?
    In a new study, a research explores questions that stem from new advances in direct-to-consumer DNA tests, which have the effect of separating the physician-patient relationship from access to new personal health data. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Researchers teach drones to land themselves on moving targets
    Researchers are using artificial intelligence called fuzzy logic to get drones to navigate and land themselves on moving platforms. This holds promise for commercial uses such as delivering packages from moving vehicles. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • English learners treated differently depending on where they go to school
    As the number of English learners continues to grow across the nation, new research indicates these students are being treated differently depending on where they go to school. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • In rare disorder, novel agent stops swelling before it starts
    A researcher who treats hereditary angioedema says a new drug, a potential game changer, is being studied in larger clinical trial. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Early birds may make healthier food choices than night owls
    Researchers looked at data from nearly 2,000 randomly chosen people to determine if their circadian or biological clock rhythm (chronotype) affected what they ate and at what time. Clear differences in both energy and macronutrients between the two chronotypes abound, with morning people making healthier choices throughout the day. Evening ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • New laser spectroscopy technique to understand atomic and nuclear structure of radioactive atoms
    An international collaboration with research groups from five countries – Belgium, Finland, France, Germany and Russia – have applyied high-resolution laser ionization of radioactive atoms in a supersonic gas jet to probe the properties of heavy elements. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • The body does not absorb genetic material from our food
    A study finds no evidence that genetic material from food is absorbed in the human body where it would, for example, be able to change the body’s ability to regulate the cholesterol metabolism or influence the immune system. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Top professional performance through psychopathy
    The term “psychopath” is not flattering: such people are considered cold, manipulative, do not feel any remorse and seek thrills without any fear – and all that at other’s expense. A study is now shattering this image. They claim that a certain form of psychopathy can lead to top professional ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Viruses support photosynthesis in bacteria
    Viruses propagate by infecting a host cell and reproducing inside. This not only affects humans and animals, but bacteria as well. This type of virus is called bacteriophage. They carry so called auxiliary metabolic genes in their genome, which are responsible for producing certain proteins that give the virus an ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Space dust deploy bubble parachutes on their fiery descent, scientists discover
    Bubbles acting like parachutes are deployed by some cosmic dust particles on their entry into Earth’s atmosphere, preventing them from burning up. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • The oldest fossil giant penguin
    A recently discovered fossil of a giant penguin with a body length of around 150 centimeters has been described in a new article. The new find dates back to the Paleocene era and, with an age of approximately 61 million years, counts among the oldest penguin fossils in the world. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Compounds that show potent anti-cancer activity in breast and colon tumor cell lines
    Potential drugs have shown low toxicity in non-tumor cell lines, which could decrease side effects during chemotherapy, researchers suggest. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Mathematics supports a new way to classify viruses based on structure
    Scientists have found new evidence to support a classification system for viruses based on viral structure. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
    Although stingless bees do not have a sting to fend off enemies, they are nonetheless able to defend their hives against attacks. Only four years ago it was discovered that a Brazilian bee species, the Jatai bee, has a soldier caste. The slightly larger fighters guard the entrance to the ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • How blood can be rejuvenated
    Our blood stem cells generate around a thousand billion new blood cells every day. But the blood stem cells’ capacity to produce blood changes as we age. This leads to older people being more susceptible to anemia, lowered immunity and a greater risk of developing certain kinds of blood cancer. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Warming temperatures could trigger starvation, extinctions in deep oceans
    Researchers from 20 of the world's leading oceanographic research centers today warned that the world's largest habitat -- the deep ocean floor -- may face starvation and sweeping ecological change by the year 2100. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Study targets warm water rings that fuel hurricane intensification in the Caribbean Sea
    A new study deployed 55 aircraft ocean instruments from the National Oceanographic Atmospheric Administration's WP-3D aircraft. The purpose of the scientific mission was to measure ocean temperature, salinity, and currents to understand the structure of these warm-water eddies. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Sorting out risk genes for brain development disorders
    Gene discovery research is uncovering similarities and differences underlying a variety of disorders affecting the developing brain, including autism, attention deficits, tics, intellectual impairments, developmental delays and language difficulties. Researchers found some genes are more closely associated with autism and others with intellectual impairments, but many times there is overlap, ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Long-term stress linked to higher levels of obesity
    People who suffer long-term stress may also be more prone to obesity, according to research that involved examining hair samples for levels of cortisol, a hormone which regulates the body's response to stress. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Scientists close in on cracking ‚Enigma Code‘ of common cold
    Scientists say they are a step closer to cracking, what researchers have dubbed, the 'enigma code' of the common cold virus. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • PI3K/mTOR inhibitors may be effective against some uterine sarcomas
    The protein P-S6S240 may serve as an indicator of poor prognosis for patients with a hard-to-treat type of uterine sarcoma called leiomyosarcoma, and preclinical data suggest that patients whose tumors have this protein may respond to PI3K/mTOR inhibitors. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Nursing home residents need more activities to help them thrive
    In a survey of staff from 172 Swedish nursing homes, most residents had been outside the nursing home during the previous week, but only one-fifth had been on an outing or excursion. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Study finds resistant infections rising, with longer hospital stays for US children
    Infections caused by a type of bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics are occurring more frequently in US children and are associated with longer hospital stays and a trend towards greater risk of death, according to a new study. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Researchers ponder the shape of birds‘ eggs
    The shape of birds' eggs varies considerably, for reasons that are unclear, outlines a new report. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Link between aging, devastating lung disease discovered
    A new study has shown evidence linking the biology of aging with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a disease that impairs lung function and causes shortness of breath, fatigue, declining quality of life, and, ultimately, death. Researchers believe that these findings are the next step toward a possible therapy for individuals suffering ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Tired teens 4.5 times more likely to commit crimes as adults
    Teenagers who experience sleep problems and exhibit anti-social behavior are more likely to commit violent crimes as adults, new research concludes. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • Is back pain killing us?
    Older people who suffer from back pain have a 13 per cent increased risk of dying from any cause, research has found. The study of 4390 Danish twins aged more than 70 years investigated whether spinal pain increased the rate of all-cause and disease-specific cardiovascular mortality. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017
  • A prescription with legs
    Physician-delivered step count prescriptions, combined with the use of a pedometer, can lead to a 20 per cent increase in daily steps, as well as measurable health benefits, such as lower blood sugar and lower insulin resistance, for patients with hypertension and/or type 2 diabetes, report researchers. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2017