Wissenschafts-Weblogs

  • A successful cancer researcher confronts a new challenge: getting elected to Congress
    Jason Westin says he wants to use “facts and science to fight back” ... read more
    Source: Latest News from Science MagazineVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2018
  • New approach to improve nitrogen use, enhance yield, and promote flowering in rice
    Using nitrogen fertilizer increases crop yields, but excess runoff causes environmental pollution. Moreover, in grains such as rice, large amounts of nitrogen fertilizer can delay flowering, leaving the crop vulnerable to late-season cold weather. A recent study has identified a rice nitrate transporter that can be overexpressed to increase grain ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2018
  • New link between gut bacteria and obesity
    Researchers have discovered a new link between gut bacteria and obesity. They found that certain amino acids in our blood can be connected to both obesity and the composition of the gut microbiome. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2018
  • Playing both ends: Amphibian adapted to varied evolutionary pressures
    Caecilian, Siphonops annulatus, a limbless amphibian found throughout Brazil, has a concentration of enlarged mucous glands in its head region and a concentration of enlarged poison glands in its posterior region. These concentration appear to have evolved from different selective pressures: the ability to tunnel into the ground and to ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2018
  • The ‚loudness‘ of our thoughts affects how we judge external sounds
    The 'loudness' of our thoughts -- or how we imagine saying something -- influences how we judge the loudness of real, external sounds. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2018
  • Watch this caterpillar fling its beetle attacker through the air
    Hornworm moth larvae have several tricks to defend themselves against predators ... read more
    Source: Latest News from Science MagazineVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2018
  • One of the most powerful science policy jobs in Brussels changes hands
    Robert-Jan Smits, one of Horizon 2020’s architects, leaves after 8 years as director-general for research ... read more
    Source: Latest News from Science MagazineVeröffentlicht am 23-02-2018
  • „Ich freue mich auf den gemeinsamen Spirit“
    Bill Hansson, Vizepräsident der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, spricht im Interview über den Max-Planck-Tag, der am 14. September 2018 stattfinden wird ... read more
    Source: Max-Planck-Gesellschaft – ForschungVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Analysis finds lower IQ in children with chronic kidney disease
    An analysis of published studies indicates that children with chronic kidney disease may have lower intellectual functioning compared than children in the general population. Compared with children with mild-to-moderate stage kidney disease and with kidney transplants, children on dialysis had the lowest IQ scores. Deficits were evident for attention, memory, ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Sweet, bitter, fat: Genetics play a role in kids‘ snacking patterns
    The types of snacks a child chooses could be linked to genetics, a new study found. The study investigated whether genetic variants in taste receptors related to sweet, fat and bitter tastes influence the snacks preschoolers choose and found nearly 80 per cent carried at least one of these genotypes ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • The global footprint of fisheries
    The global fishing fleet is so big it can be seen from space. Really. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Turning light upside down
    Researchers have developed a 'hyperbolic metasurface' on which light propagates with completely reshaped wavefronts. The achievement towards a more precise control and monitoring of light is particularly relevant to the technological challenges of miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • New crystal structures reveal mysterious mechanism of gene regulation by the ‚magic spot‘
    Using an innovative crystallization technique for studying 3D structures of gene transcription machinery, researchers revealed new insights into the long debated action of the 'magic spot' -- a molecule that controls gene expression in E. coli and many other bacteria when the bacteria are stressed. The study contributes to fundamental ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Monkey Vocabulary Decoded
    From short 'tsiks' and 'ekks' to drawn-out 'phees' -- all the sounds produced by marmoset monkeys are made up of individual syllables of fixed length, according to a new study. The smallest units of vocalization and their rhythmic production in the brain of our relatives could also have been a ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Surprising new study redraws family tree of domesticated and ‚wild‘ horses
    New research overturns a long-held assumption that Przewalski's horses, native to the Eurasian steppes, are the last wild horse species on Earth. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • DNA gets away: Scientists catch the rogue molecule that can trigger autoimmunity
    A research team has discovered the process -- and filmed the actual moment -- that can change the body's response to a dying cell. Importantly, what they call the 'Great Escape' moment may one day prove to be the crucial trigger for autoimmune diseases like arthritis. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Newly designed molecule binds nitrogen
    Chemists have developed a boron-based molecule capable of binding nitrogen without assistance from a transition metal. This might be the first step towards the energy-saving production of fertilizers. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Evolutionary change in protein function respects biophysical principles
    Some molecular biologists who study the proteins that regulate cell operations do not confine their research to understanding the molecules' current roles. They also look deep into the proteins' evolutionary past to explore what structures have allowed proteins with new functions to develop in response to new needs. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Understanding the wetting of micro-textured surfaces can help give them new functionalities
    The wetting and adhesion characteristics of solid surfaces critically depend on their fine structures. However, until now, our understanding of exactly how the sliding behavior of liquid droplets depends on surface microstructures has been limited. Now, physicists have conducted experimental and theoretical studies on the friction of liquid droplets on ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Developing reliable quantum computers
    Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can't manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to ensure it is working reliably? Depending on the algorithmic task, this could be an easy or a very difficult certification problem. An international team of ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Quantum recurrence: Everything goes back to the way it was
    When a complex system is left alone, it will return to its initial state with almost perfect precision. Gas particles in a container, for example, will return almost exactly to their starting positions after some time. For decades, scientists have investigated how this 'Poincaré Recurrence Theorem' can be applied to ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Positive results for larotrectinib against TRK-fusion cancer
    55 patients representing 17 cancer types tested positive for TRK fusion and were treated with larotrectinib. Overall response rate was 75 percent. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • The Australian government’s plan for the biocontrol of the common carp presents several risks
    Scientists are calling on the Australian authorities to review their decision to introduce the carp herpes virus as a way to combat the common carp having colonized the country's rivers. They not only believe that this measure will be ineffective but that it also represents a risk to ecosystems. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Looking for the origins of schizophrenia
    Schizophrenia may be related to neurodevelopment changes, including brain's inability to create the appropriate vascular system, according to new study. The results broaden the understanding about the causes of this severe and disabling disorder, which affects about 1 percent of the world's population. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Toenail fungus gives up sex to infect human hosts
    The fungus that causes athlete's foot and other skin and toenail infections may have lost its ability to sexually reproduce as it adapted to grow on human hosts. The discovery that this species may be asexual -- and therefore nearly identical at the genetic level -- uncovers potential vulnerabilities that ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • C-sections and gut bacteria increase risk of childhood obesity
    New research has found that overweight and obese women are more like to have children who are overweight or obese by three years of age -- and that bacteria in the gut may be partially to blame. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Mind-reading algorithm uses EEG data to reconstruct images based on what we perceive
    A new technique developed by neuroscientists can reconstruct images of what people perceive based on their brain activity gathered by EEG. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Engineers advance capability of wearable tech
    Creating the perfect wearable device to monitor muscle movement, heart rate and other tiny bio-signals without breaking the bank has inspired scientists to look for a simpler and more affordable tool. Now, researchers have developed a practical way to monitor and interpret human motion, in what may be the missing ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Animal diversity improves reproducibility of pre-clinical research
    Pre-clinical animal research is typically based on single laboratory studies conducted under highly standardized conditions. But in a new study, researchers show that this near-universal practice may actually help to explain the poor reproducibility of pre-clinical animal research. Instead of standardized conditions, diversity may be better. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • In living color: Seeing cells from outside the body with synthetic bioluminescence
    Glowing creatures like fireflies and jellyfish are captivating to look at but also a boon for science, as their bioluminescent molecules contribute to visualizing a host of biological processes. Now, scientists have supercharged these molecules, making them hundreds of times brighter in deep tissues and allowing for imaging of cells ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Alternative methods needed to detect all schistosomiasis cases
    To detect detect intestinal schistosome infections, the World Health Organization recommends using the Kato-Katz technique, which analyzes slides of fecal matter. But the approach often misses people who are infected with only a low burden of parasites and, as a consequence, shed only a few eggs in fecal samples. Researchers ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Scientists gain new insight on how antibodies interact with widespread respiratory virus
    Scientists have found and characterized the activity of four antibodies produced by the human immune system that target an important protein found in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), according to new research. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Scientists find molecular link between Vitamin A derivative and mouse intestinal health
    New research shows that all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), the active form of vitamin A, regulates immune system responses in the mouse intestine by controlling expression of the protein HIC1 in cells known as innate lymphoid cells. These findings could suggest new ways to fight disease. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Loops, loops, and more loops: This is how your DNA gets organized
    A living cell is able to neatly package a big jumble of DNA into chromosomes while preparing for cell division. For over a century, scientists have been puzzled for decades on how the process works. Researchers now managed for the first time to isolate and film the process, and witnessed ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • How bats carry viruses without getting sick
    Bats are known to harbor highly pathogenic viruses like Ebola or Marburg and yet they do not show clinical signs of disease. Scientists find that in bats, an antiviral immune pathway called the STING-interferon pathway is dampened, and bats can maintain just enough defense against illness without triggering a heightened ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Gut microbes protect against sepsis: Mouse study
    Sepsis occurs when the body's response to the spread of bacteria or toxins to the bloodstream damages tissues and organs. The fight against sepsis could get a helping hand from a surprising source: gut bacteria. Researchers found that giving mice particular microbes increased blood levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies, ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • A look at the space between mouse brain cells
    Between the brain's neurons and glial cells is a critical but understudied structure that's been called neuroscience's final frontier: the extracellular space. With a new imaging paradigm, scientists can now see into and study this complex fluid-filled matrix. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Stagnation in the South Pacific
    A team led by geochemist has discovered important evidence that the rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels at the end of the last ice age was triggered by changes in the Antarctic Ocean. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Neanderthals were artistic like modern humans
    Scientists have found the first major evidence that Neanderthals, rather than modern humans, created the world's oldest known cave paintings -- suggesting they may have had an artistic sense similar to our own. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Age and gender matter behind the wheel — but not how you might expect
    A new study explored the relationship between new drivers' skills and age, gender, organized sports and video gaming. The results suggest that mandatory training should be required for all novice drivers, not just teenagers. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Neandertals that made art, live news from the AAAS Annual Meeting, and the emotional experience of being a scientist
    We talk about the techniques of painting sleuths, how to combat alternative facts or “fake news,” and using audio signposts to keep birds from flying into buildings. For this segment, David Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with host Sarah Crespi as part of a live podcast event from the AAAS ... read more
    Source: Science Magazine PodcastVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Neandertaler dachten wie wir
    Bereits vor mehr als 64.000 Jahren schufen Neandertaler auf der Iberischen Halbinsel Höhlenmalereien ... read more
    Source: Max-Planck-Gesellschaft – ForschungVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Symbolic use of marine shells and mineral pigments by Iberian Neandertals 115,000 years ago
    Cueva de los Aviones (southeast Spain) is a site of the Neandertal-associated Middle Paleolithic of Europe. It has yielded ochred and perforated marine shells, red and yellow colorants, and shell containers that feature residues of complex pigmentatious mixtures. Similar finds from the Middle Stone Age of South Africa have been ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Descriptive phrases for how often food should be eaten helps preschoolers better understand healthy eating
    Preschool is a critical period for children to begin to make their own dietary decisions to develop life-long healthy eating habits. A new study found that preschoolers who learned how to classify food as healthy or unhealthy were more likely to say they would choose healthy food as a snack. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Extinct lakes of the American desert west
    The vestiges of lakes long extinct dot the landscape of the American desert west. These fossilized landforms provide clues of how dynamic climate has been over the past few million years. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • Weather should remain predictable despite climate change
    New research suggests that even as rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere drive the climate toward warmer temperatures, the weather will remain predictable. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • With computation, researchers identify promising solid oxide fuel cell materials
    Using advanced computational methods, materials scientists have discovered new materials that could bring widespread commercial use of solid oxide fuel cells closer to reality. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • When every fish counts: Genetic tools can ensure accuracy of identification of endangered fish
    Genetic analysis showed about one-third of endangered delta smelt were misidentified in surveys of the Yolo Bypass. Their study found that genetic tools can be a powerful complement to visual identification of endangered fish. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • New insights on the neurobiology of dying
    A new study provides insight into the neurobiology of dying. For the study, investigators performed continuous patient monitoring following Do Not Resuscitate - Comfort Care orders in patients with devastating brain injury to investigate the mechanisms and timing of events in the brain and the circulation during the dying process. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018
  • New symmetry-breaking method opens way for bioactive compounds
    Chemists have developed a new catalytic method for symmetry breaking. The method can help synthesize important building blocks for bioactive compounds such as anticancer drugs. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-02-2018