Wissenschafts-Weblogs

  • Biologists find surprising variability in courtship behaviors of wolf spiders
    Studies of wolf spiders found that courtship displays help preserve genetic isolation between closely related species. Another study found that the species Gladicosa bellamyi used multi-modal communication to entice females. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Yellow fever killing thousands of monkeys in Brazil
    In a vulnerable forest in southeastern Brazil, where the air was once thick with the guttural chatter of brown howler monkeys, there now exists silence. Yellow fever, a virus carried by mosquitoes and endemic to Africa and South America, has robbed the private, federally-protected reserve of its brown howlers in ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Biopesticide could defeat insecticide resistance in bedbugs
    A fungal biopesticide that shows promise for the control of bed bugs is highly effective even against bed-bug populations that are insecticide resistant, according to research. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Transgender college freshmen drink more, experience more blackouts, study shows
    A survey of more than 422,000 college freshmen found that students who identified as transgender were more likely than their cisgender peers to experience negative consequences from drinking, including memory blackouts, academic problems and conflicts such as arguments or physical fights. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Research questions effectiveness of translocation conservation method
    A DNA study of endangered greater prairie chickens in Illinois indicates that supplementing the dwindling population with birds from out of state did not improve genetic diversity. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Heart tissue grown on spinach leaves
    Researchers face a fundamental challenge as they seek to scale up human tissue regeneration from small lab samples to full-size tissues and organs: how to establish a vascular system that delivers blood deep into the developing tissue. Researchers have now successfully turned to plants, culturing beating human heart cells on ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Tracing aromatic molecules in the early Universe
    A molecule found in car engine exhaust fumes that is thought to have contributed to the origin of life on Earth has made astronomers heavily underestimate the amount of stars that were forming in the early Universe, a study has found. That molecule is called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. On Earth ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Humans, smartphones may fail frequently to detect face morph photos
    Both humans and smartphones show a degree of error in distinguishing face morph photos from their 'real' faces on fraudulent identity cards, new research has found. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Too much structured knowledge hurts creativity, shows study
    Structure organizes human activities and help us understand the world with less effort, but it can be the killer of creativity, concludes a new study. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Optical tool monitors brain’s circulatory response to pain
    A new report demonstrates that an optical imaging tool used to monitor regional blood flow and tissue oxygenation may be used to track the brain's response to acute pain in infants, children, and adults. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • ‚Spectacular-looking‘ endangered frog species discovered in Ecuador’s cloud forests
    It's not every day someone gets to say, 'I've discovered a new species.' It's a claim that biologist Chris Funk can happily make. Funk and collaborators, who've spent years exploring the tropical climes of South America to study the region's dizzying biodiversity, have documented a new species of rainfrog they've ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Brain ‚rewires‘ itself to enhance other senses in blind people
    The brains of those who are born blind make new connections in the absence of visual information, resulting in enhanced, compensatory abilities such as a heightened sense of hearing, smell and touch, as well as cognitive functions (such as memory and language) according to a new study. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Scientists evade the Heisenberg uncertainty principle
    Researchers report the discovery of a new technique that could drastically improve the sensitivity of instruments such as magnetic resonance imagers (MRIs) and atomic clocks. The study reports a technique to bypass the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This technique hides quantum uncertainty in atomic features not seen by the instrument, allowing ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Silence is golden: Suppressing host response to Ebola virus may help to control infection
    The Ebola virus causes a severe, often fatal illness when it infects the human body. Initially targeting cells of the immune system called macrophages, white blood cells that absorb and clear away pathogens, a new study has found a way to potentially 'silence' these Ebola virus-infected macrophages. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Lack of staffing, funds prevent marine protected areas from realizing full potential
    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an increasingly popular strategy for protecting marine biodiversity, but a new global study demonstrates that widespread lack of personnel and funds are preventing MPAs from reaching their full potential. Only 9 percent of MPAs reported having adequate staff. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Use of mobile app reduces number of in-person follow-up visits after surgery
    Patients who underwent ambulatory breast reconstruction and used a mobile app for follow-up care had fewer in-person visits during the first 30 days after the operation without affecting complication rates or measures of patient-reported satisfaction, according to a study. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Tiller the Hun? Farmers in Roman Empire converted to Hun lifestyle — and vice versa
    New archaeological analysis suggests people of Western Roman Empire switched between Hunnic nomadism and settled farming over a lifetime. Findings may be evidence of tribal encroachment that undermined Roman Empire during 5th century AD, contributing to its fall. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Surprising new role for lungs: Making blood
    Using video microscopy in the living mouse lung, scientists have revealed that the lungs play a previously unrecognized role in blood production. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • First mutations in human life discovered
    The earliest mutations of human life have been observed by researchers. Analyzing genomes from adult cells, the scientists could look back in time to reveal how each embryo developed. The study shows that from the two-cell stage of the human embryo, one of these cells becomes more dominant than the ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • New study shakes the roots of the dinosaur family tree
    More than a century of theory about the evolutionary history of dinosaurs has been turned on its head following the publication of new research. The work suggests that the family groupings need to be rearranged, redefined and renamed and also that dinosaurs may have originated in the northern hemisphere rather ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Brief module effective in teaching hemorrhage control basics to staff in a large workplace
    A medical team has developed a way to effectively provide a large group of people with basic knowledge and skills to locate and use bleeding control equipment to stop life-threatening bleeding in severely injured people. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Molecular ‚treasure maps‘ to help discover new materials
    Scientists have developed a new method which has the potential to revolutionise the way we search for, design and produce new materials. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Scientists identify a new way gut bacteria break down complex sugars
    New light has been shed on the functioning of human gut bacteria which could help to develop medicines in the future to improve health and well-being. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Sea ice extent sinks to record lows at both poles
    The Arctic sea ice maximum extent and Antarctic minimum extent are both record lows this year. Combined, sea ice numbers are at their lowest point since satellites began to continuously measure sea ice in 1979. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Light used to remotely control curvature of plastics
    Researchers have developed a technique that uses light to get flat, plastic sheets to curve into spheres, tubes or bowls. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Under the dead sea, warnings of dire drought
    Nearly 1,000 feet below the bed of the Dead Sea, scientists have found evidence that during past warm periods, the Mideast has suffered drought on scales never recorded by humans -- a possible warning for current times. Thick layers of crystalline salt show that rainfall plummeted to as little as ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Weight-bearing exercises promote bone formation in men
    Osteoporosis affects more than 200 million people worldwide and is a serious public health concern, according to research. Now, newly published work is the first in men to show that long-term, weight-bearing exercises decrease sclerostin, a protein made in the bone, and increase IGF-1, a hormone associated with bone growth. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Researchers help map future of precision medicine in Parkinson’s disease
    A new transformative approach to defining, studying and treating Parkinson's disease has been revealed by investigators. Rather than approaching Parkinson's disease as a single entity, the international cadre of researchers advocates targeting therapies to distinct 'nodes or clusters' of patients based on specific symptoms or molecular features of their disease. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Terrestrial support of lake food webs: Synthesis reveals controls over cross-ecosystem resource use
    Widespread evidence that organic matter exported from terrestrial into aquatic ecosystems supports recipient food webs remains controversial. A pressing question is not only whether high terrestrial support is possible but also what the general conditions are under which it arises. We assemble the largest data set, to date, of the ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Nonrainfall water origins and formation mechanisms
    Dryland ecosystems cover 40% of the total land surface on Earth and are defined broadly as zones where precipitation is considerably less than the potential evapotranspiration. Nonrainfall waters (for example, fog and dew) are the least-studied and least-characterized components of the hydrological cycle, although they supply critical amounts of water ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Self-powered integrated microfluidic point-of-care low-cost enabling (SIMPLE) chip
    Portable, low-cost, and quantitative nucleic acid detection is desirable for point-of-care diagnostics; however, current polymerase chain reaction testing often requires time-consuming multiple steps and costly equipment. We report an integrated microfluidic diagnostic device capable of on-site quantitative nucleic acid detection directly from the blood without separate sample preparation steps. First, ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Female brain size affects the assessment of male attractiveness during mate choice
    Mate choice decisions are central in sexual selection theory aimed to understand how sexual traits evolve and their role in evolutionary diversification. We test the hypothesis that brain size and cognitive ability are important for accurate assessment of partner quality and that variation in brain size and cognitive ability underlies ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Agrobacterium delivers VirE2 protein into host cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis
    Agrobacterium tumefaciens can cause crown gall tumors on a wide range of host plants. As a natural genetic engineer, the bacterium can transfer both single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) [transferred DNA (T-DNA)] molecules and bacterial virulence proteins into various recipient cells. Among Agrobacterium-delivered proteins, VirE2 is an ssDNA binding protein that is ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Canopy near-infrared reflectance and terrestrial photosynthesis
    Global estimates of terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) remain highly uncertain, despite decades of satellite measurements and intensive in situ monitoring. We report a new approach for quantifying the near-infrared reflectance of terrestrial vegetation (NIRV). NIRV provides a foundation for a new approach to estimate GPP that consistently untangles the ... read more
    Source: Science Advances current issueVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • 3-D printing turns nanomachines into life-size workers
    Researchers have unlocked the key to transforming microscopic nanorings into smart materials that perform work at human-scale. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Machine learning lets scientists reverse-engineer cellular control networks
    Researchers have used machine learning on the Stampede supercomputer to model the cellular control network that determines how tadpoles develop. Using that model, they reverse-engineered a drug intervention that created tadpoles with a form of mixed pigmentation never before seen in nature. They plan to use the method for cancer ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Upper part of Earth’s magnetic field reveals details of a dramatic past
    Satellites have been mapping the upper part of the Earth magnetic field by collecting data for three years and found some amazing features about the Earth’s crust. The result is the release of highest resolution map of this field seen from space to date. This ‘lithospheric magnetic field’ is very ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Making ‚mulch‘ ado of ant hills
    Ants are hardworking and beneficial insects, research reveals. In the activities of their daily lives, ants help increase air, water flow, and organic matter in soil. The work done by ants even forms a type of mulch that helps hold water in the soil. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Study identifies brain cells involved in Pavlovian response
    A new study has traced the Pavlovian response to a small cluster of brain cells -- the same neurons that go awry during Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease and Tourette's syndrome. The research could one day help neuroscientists find new approaches to diagnosing and treating these disorders. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Scientists identify brain circuit that drives pleasure-inducing behavior
    Neuroscientists have discovered a brain circuit that responds to rewarding events. Scientists have long believed that the central amygdala, a structure located deep within the brain, is linked with fear and responses to unpleasant events, but the new study finds that most of the neurons here are involved in the ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Lack of leisure: Is busyness the new status symbol?
    Long gone are the days when a life of material excess and endless leisure time signified prestige. According to a new study, Americans increasingly perceive busy and overworked people as having high status. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Self-sustaining bacteria-fueled power cell created
    Researchers have developed the next step in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with the first micro-scale self-sustaining cell, which generated power for 13 straight days through symbiotic interactions of two types of bacteria. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Ultrafast measurements explain quantum dot voltage drop
    Solar cells and photodetectors could soon be made from new types of materials based on semiconductor quantum dots, thanks to new insights based on ultrafast measurements capturing real-time photoconversion processes. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Fledgling stars try to prevent their neighbors from birthing planets
    Stars don't have to be massive to evaporate material from around nearby stars and affect their ability to form planets, a new study suggests. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Method speeds testing of new networking protocols
    Researchers present a system for testing new traffic management protocols that requires no alteration to network hardware but still works at realistic speeds -- 20 times as fast as networks of software-controlled routers. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • ‚Super sponge‘ promises effective toxic clean-up of lakes and more
    Mercury is very toxic and can cause long-term health damage, but removing it from water is challenging. To address this growing problem scientists have created a sponge that can absorb mercury from a polluted water source within seconds. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • Study suggests new way to prevent vision loss in diabetics, premature babies
    A new molecule that induces the formation of abnormal blood vessels in the eyes of diabetic mice has been discovered by researchers. Their study suggests that inhibiting this molecule may prevent similarly aberrant blood vessels from damaging the vision of not only diabetics, but also premature infants. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • ‚First in human‘ trial defines safe dosage for small molecule drug ONC201 for solid cancer tumors
    A ‘first in human’ clinical trial examining the small molecule drug ONC201 in cancer patients with advanced solid tumors shows that this investigational drug is well tolerated at the recommended phase II dose. That’s according to investigators whose research also showed early signs of clinical benefit in patients with advanced ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • How do metals interact with DNA?
    Since a couple of decades, metal-containing drugs have been successfully used to fight against certain types of cancer. The lack of knowledge about the underlying molecular mechanisms slows down the search for new and more efficient chemotherapeutic agents. Scientists have now developed a protocol that is able to detect how ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017
  • After the epigenome: The epitranscriptome
    A new article explains that RNA also has its own spelling and grammar, just like DNA. These 'epigenetics of RNA' are called epitranscriptome. ... read more
    Source: Science dailyVeröffentlicht am 22-03-2017